The following Conditions are related to Weakness

Select a specific condition below to view its details.

  • Acholuric jaundice

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  • Alpha thalassemia

    Thalassemia signs and symptoms can include: Fatigue Weakness Pale or yellowish skin Facial bone deformities Slow growth Abdominal swelling Dark urine Some babies show signs and symptoms of thalassemia at birth; others develop them during the first two years of life. Some people who have only one affected hemoglobin gene don't have thalassemia symptoms.  Read More

  • Anemia

    Anemia treatment depends on the cause.  Read More

  • Aortic dissection

    Introduction to aortic dissection The aorta is the large blood vessel that leads from the heart and carries blood to the rest of the body. It originates at the aortic valve at the outlet of the left ventricle of the heart and ascends within the chest to an arch where blood vessels branch off to supply blood flow to the arms and head. The aorta then begins to descend through the chest and into the abdomen where it splits into two iliac  Read More

  • Atrial fibrillation

    Atrial fibrillation (A-fib) is an irregular and often very rapid heart rhythm (arrhythmia) that can lead to blood clots in the heart. A-fib increases the risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications.  Read More

  • Autosomal dominant long qt syndrome

    Many people who have long QT syndrome don't have any signs or symptoms. You might be aware of your condition only because of: Results of an electrocardiogram (ECG) done for an unrelated reason A family history of long QT syndrome Genetic testing results Fainting is the most common sign of long QT syndrome. Fainting (syncope) occurs when the heart temporarily beats in an unorganized way  Read More

  • Congestive heart failure

    Heart failure occurs when the heart muscle doesn't pump blood as well as it should. Blood often backs up and causes fluid to build up in the lungs (congest) and in the legs. The fluid buildup can cause shortness of breath and swelling of the legs and feet. Poor blood flow may cause the skin to appear blue (cyanotic). Some types of heart failure can lead to an enlarged heart. Heart failure can be ongoing (chronic), or it may start sudde  Read More

  • Da costa's syndrome

    Da Costa’s Syndrome, variously named as effort syndrome, cardiac neurosis, neurocirculatory asthenia, etc is a psychiatric disorder in which the patient experiences chest pain. This may mimic angina, a type of chest pain. Commonly found in women, it is a syndrome in close association with symptoms of anxiety.Cure for Da Costa’s Syndrome It is shown in the reports of Da Costa and Wheeler that patients did  Read More

  • Elfin facies with hypercalcemia

    A rare genetic condition known as Elin facies with hypercalcemia is characterized by developmental delays both before and after birth, short stature, varying degrees of mental deficiency, and distinctive facial features that usually become more obvious with age. It is named after Williams and Beuren, who first identified it. As a result, Williams-Beuren syndrome is another name for it. The majority of Williams syndrome cases see  Read More

  • Endocardial fibroelastosis

    Risk factors for endocardial fibroelastosis include: Age – The older you are, the more likely it is that you will develop endocardial fibroelastosis. This condition occurs most commonly in people over 65 years of age, but it has been found in individuals as young as 30 years old and even infants. Family history – If your parents or siblings have had this condition, then you have a higher risk as well. It's  Read More

  • Endocarditis

    Endocarditis is a serious inflammation of one of the four heart valves.  Read More

  • Fibroelastic endocarditis

    The cause of fibroelastic endocarditis/Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF), is not known, but it can be treated using antibiotics. If you have fibroelastic endocarditis, it's important to take your medication as prescribed by your doctor. The treatment for fibroelastic endocarditis will depend on what type of valve is affected and how severe the infection is. In some cases, surgery may be needed to replace damaged  Read More

  • Heart disease: heart valve disease

    According to the American Heart Association, about 5 million Americans are diagnosed with valvular heart disease each year. What Is Valvular Heart Disease? Heart valve disease occurs when your heart's valves do not work the way they should. How Do Heart Valves Work? Your heart valves lie at the exit of each of your four heart chambers and maintain one-way blood flow through your heart. The four heart valves make  Read More

  • Hemolytic uremic syndrome

    What is hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS)? Hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) is a disease of two body systems, the blood stream and the kidney. Hemolysis describes the destruction of red blood cells. In hemolytic uremic syndrome, blood within capillaries, the smallest blood vessels in the body, begins to clot abnormally. When red blood cells pass through the clogged capillaries, they are sheared apart and broken. (hemo=blood +lysis=destruc  Read More

  • Long qt syndrome type 1

    The potassium ion channels in the heart do not function properly in long QT syndrome type 1, which causes interference with the electrical activity of the heart. In people with LQT1, emotional stress or physical activity, especially swimming, can cause arrhythmias (abnormal heartbeats). LQT1 patients are more likely to experience torsades de pointes, the most dangerous type of ventricular tachycardia. Althoug  Read More

  • Non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopa...

    The symptoms of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy can be very different from one person to another and even within a single case. That's because this condition is caused by genetic mutations that cause the heart muscle to grow at an accelerated rate, making it harder for your heart to pump blood through your body. The most common symptom of non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy is shortness of breath. It can feel  Read More

  • Nonobstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopat...

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  • Subendocardial sclerosis

    Although the precise cause of this disease is unknown, the following risk factors can increase your chances of developing subendocardial sclerosis: Develops in people with a genetic predisposition (family history of heart disease, genetic disorder, and infections linked to other heart ailments). Cocaine use or viral infection can act as a trigger for disease People with diabetes are more likely to develop thi  Read More

  • Takayasu disease (takayasu arteritis)

    There is no cure for takayasu disease (takayasu arteritis). However, a comprehensive treatment plan can be followed to improve the symptoms, reduce inflammation and prevent irreversible damage to artery walls. Takayasu disease or Takayasu Arteritis (TAK) is a type of vasculitis, a rare familial disorder characterized by inflammation of blood vessels. The condition affects the aorta and its branches, which resist the flow of bl  Read More

  • The heart and vascular disease

    The Heart and Vascular disease demand the patient to induce in their lives changes such as eating healthy, exercising regularly, and not smoking. However, certain medications or surgeries help doctors deal with the heart and vascular disease to a great extent. Medications- Medicines often provided by the doctors to treat heart and vascular diseases include- Cholesterol Drugs- Medicines can help reduce cholesterol level  Read More